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David Emile Durkheim

The Division of Labor in Society

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The Division of Labor in Society 1997 [1893], New York: Free Press.

 

From the Publisher:

In a momentous challenge to the theories of Adam Smith and Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim presented a visionary reconception of the social structures of production and allocation that are the cornerstones of capitalism.  In the Division of Labor in Society originally published in French in 1893, Durkheim asked how individuality can be maintained within the capitalist system.  The author argued that the class conflict is not inherent in capitalist society, as Marx contended, but that the unfettered growth of state power would lead to the extinction of individuality.  Only in a free society that promotes voluntary bonds between its members, Durkheim suggests, can individuality prosper.

 

 

Table of Contents:

Translator's Note
Introduction (by Lewis Coser)
Preface to the First Edition
Preface to the Second Edition
Introduction

 

BOOK I: THE FUNCTION OF THE DIVISION OF LABOUR
Chapter:
I: The Method of Determining this Function
II: Mechanical Solidarity, or Solidarity by Similarities
III: Solidarity Arising from the Division of Labour, or Organic Solidarity
IV: Another Proof of the Preceding Theory
V: The Increasing Preponderance of Organic Solidarity and its Consequences
VI: The Increasing Preponderance of Organic Solidarity and its Consequences (cont.)
VII: Organic Solidarity and Contractual Solidarity

 

BOOK II THE CAUSES AND CONDITIONS
Chapter:
I: The Progress of the Division of Labour and of Happiness
II: The Causes
III: Secondary Factors
IV: Secondary Factors (cont.)
V: Consequences of the Foregoing

 

BOOK III THE ABNORMAL FORMS
Chapter:
I: The Anomic Division of Labour
II: The Forced Division of Labour
III: Another Abnormal Form

Conclusion
Index